Scott Stratten Interview

Episode 5:  Scott Stratten Interview
The Honest Real Estate Agent Podcast

Scott Stratten

 

 

Scott Stratten’s Website:  www.unmarketing.com

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Will the Internet Replace Realtors?

Episode 4:  Will the Internet Replace Realtors?
The Honest Real Estate Agent Podcast

 

 

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Mike Kim Interview

Episode 3:  Mike Kim Interview (How Not to Make a First Impression)
The Honest Real Estate Agent Podcast

Mike Kim Brand You Podcast

Mike Kim

 

 

Mike Kim’s Website:  www.mikekim.com

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What Type of Realtor Are You?

Episode 2:  What Type of Realtor Are You?
The Honest Real Estate Agent Podcast

 

 

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Episode 1:  We Become What We Think About
The Honest Real Estate Agent Podcast

 

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The Honest Real Estate Agent is now Available on Audible

Exciting News!!

My book “The Honest Real Estate Agent” is now available in audio book form.  This has been a long-term goal of mine and I am so happy to see my book on Audible.

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A Fun and Entertaining Real Estate Video

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Respect The “Inbox”

Front Door of House

 

more info here Respect Your Customer’s “Inbox”  

I sign up for a lot of email and newsletter lists online to see how other people market themselves.

I feel the most important takeaway I have learned from email marketing is to respect your customer’s inbox.   You might be wondering why I use the word “customer” in this context?  It’s appropriate because it was an exchange of value–I gave the person my email address with the expectation that I would receive emails which were of interest and helpful to me.  A fair trade.  We get bombarded everyday online by websites wanting our email address.  Remember this when you get an email address from a prospective customer.   Be responsible with your email marketing.

I’m writing this post this morning because last week I signed up to be on a person’s email list to have access to a training type video–I signed up on the evening of September 30.  Since then I have received 14 emails from this person trying to sell me one of his products.  Crazy!!  I have lost respect and admiration for him even though he is recognized as an expert in his field.

Have you had a similar experience lately?   I sure hope not.

 

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So, You Wanna Be a Real Estate Agent… How Much Does it Cost to Go Into Real Estate? Part 2

So, You Wanna Be a Real Estate Agent… How Much Does it Cost to Go Into Real Estate? Part 2

Guest Post by Jennifer Allan-Hagedorn

Jennifer Allan-Hagedorn

Jennifer Allan-Hagedorn

 

I hope you were able to complete your assignment from last week to do an honest assessment of your financial situation.

Today I’m going to help you figure out how much it costs to get INTO real estate and to BE IN real estate on a monthly basis. Of course, any figures you see here are purely estimates and will vary widely depending on the state you live in and the office you eventually work in. And, I’m sure I’ve forgotten a few items in my list of expenses and perhaps included some that won’t apply to you. But I did my best ;-]

Getting INTO Real Estate Expenses

  • Real Estate School: $500-$1200
  • Exam, Background Check: $100-$300
  • Activate Real Estate License: $80
  • Join the National Association of REALTORS + Local Board: $400 – $700 (annual fee)
  • Ethics Class: $40
  • “Initiation” Fee: $1,000 (many franchises don’t require this)
  • Initial business cards: $20-$40
  • Open House signs: $100+
  • For Sale signs: $100-$200
  • Lockboxes: $100-$300

Being IN Real Estate Monthly Expenses:

  • Desk Fee (If you aren’t on a split): $500 – $1700
  • MLS Fees: $30-$60
  • Miscellaneous office charges (advertising, copy/printing, voicemail, website): $50 – $400
  • Contact Management System: $35 – $90
  • Printing and postage: $100
  • Website: $50-$100

Of course, you’ll also need to factor in the cost of your gas, increased cost of car insurance (since you’ll be using your car for business), cell phone charges, health insurance if you aren’t covered elsewhere, wardrobe expenses, computer equipment and programs, home office expenses (increased utilities, etc.), and probably other stuff I haven’t thought of, but I hope this makes it clear that getting into and staying in real estate isn’t something to be taken lightly from a financial perspective.

But here’s some good news.

Contrary to what you might hear, you don’t have to spend a fortune marketing yourself in your early days – and it’s not necessary to purchase every gizmo-gadget and techno-toy available. In fact, the majority of effective marketing for new agents costs nothing or very little. If you enroll in the follow-up newsletter to this one, or in one of our rookie training programs, we’ll help you figure out where to spend your precious marketing dollars, but for now, the good news is that you don’t have to factor in a significant amount of money for self-promotion in your early days.

So, how do you feel about your financial readiness to enter a real estate career so far? Please feel free to share your thoughts!

Next time we’ll talk about a part-time versus full-time real estate career.

Sell With Soul

Jennifer Allan-Hagedorn began her writing career after ten years of selling real estate successfully in Denver, Colorado. She was dismayed at the low level of professionalism she frequently encountered in the real estate industry and, with her “soulful” message, hopes to encourage the real estate community to self correct the negative stereotypes of the profession.

Jennifer’s message to agents is that they should strive to be competent real estate advisers, rather than competent real estate prospectors. She urges agents to respect the intelligence of their clients, rather than attempt to insult that intelligence with aggressive closing techniques. She preaches that agents should appreciate the significant commissions paid by their clients, rather than complain that they, themselves, are not appreciated.

Allan-Hagedorn is the author of seven books about real estate and one of the industry’s most popular bloggers. She is also an avid dog rescuer in the Panhandle of Florida.

To learn more about Selling Real Estate with Soul, visit Jennifer’s website visit site www.SellwithSoul.com

 

“Your First Day as a Real Estate Agent” Online Course Available Now for $39.00

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Follow the Trail of Breadcrumbs by Matt Parker

The Real Estate Sales Secret

Matt Parker

Breadcrumbs

In “The Real Estate Sales Secret,” I discuss breadcrumbs; little clues or signs of success.

This year I am guessing my company will hire about fifty new agents.  How many of these will have a fruitful, positive, and motivating year?  That’s an open ended question, one that I hope is answered with a high number.  It’s also a question the answer to which is within your control as an individual at your company.

I have been taking notice of what some of the newer agents are doing to be successful; what breadcrumbs are they leaving?  By successful, I mean not just closing deals, but also looking happy and motivated, living an impassioned life.

Here is what I have been noticing from newer agents who are having good success:

More than anything, I see them actively in my office.  There is no specific time they seem to be here, or even amount of time.  I just see them routinely.

100% of the new agents I am seeing have success emanate humility — they act humbly.  They have not been posturing, vocalizing past success, or “making lots of noise.”

Additionally, 100% of the new agents whom are having success have been asking lots of questions.  I see them routinely asking the receptionist questions.  They ask lots of questions of our managing broker.  They ask me lots of questions.  Listening is power, and these people are just soaking up power.

The successful new agents I notice vary in age, race, and even in “look,” BUT they all smile routinely.  They all laugh at my jokes too (at least they are faking it!!!).

They are individuals, not having started in a team framework.

They are consistently seen educating themselves, trying to understand things they don’t, or, aren’t good at.

By no means is this a comprehensive scientific study.  Having said that, I found it interesting, when I thought about the breadcrumbs of successful new agents, that they were all doing the same things.  One of them even signed a nearly $1,000,000 waterfront sale, closing this week (congrats to a dreamer Brian O’Neal!).

In these clues, hopefully there are some areas you see that can and will improve your life and your business.  If people are doing things or behaving in a certain way, and, on a small scale, demonstrating success, other new agents, and, we tenured agents, can learn from them.

Here’s to the rookies!

Matt Parker

  • Matt Parker
  • Keller Williams
  • Website
  • Matt Parker is a decorated Seattle-based Real Estate Broker having been voted by customers and peers to be a top agent year after year.  He is a 4-time Five Star Professional, a multiple time national top 10% realtor and has been used for national and local television and print media on NBC, KOMO and the Seattle Times.
  • Matt is the Author of the New Book “The Real Estate Sales Secret”

 

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